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High School Implementation

Implementing a multi-tiered model of supports at the high school level involves a set of unique strategies that may be very different from implementation in the earlier grades. This section of the Web site provides information and materials to assist with high school implementation.

What Makes High Schools Unique (Horner, 2006)

  • Larger and more diverse population of students
    • Bigger campus environments
    • More staff
    • Larger administrative team
  • “Adolescence” – importance of choices, decision making, autonomy, and identification with a peer social group increases.
  • Mind set for some is to put in time and accumulate credits for a diploma.
  • Tension: Provide comprehensive curriculum with high academic standards and employment preparation accessible to diverse students.
  • Social culture is important in high school.
  • Social culture in high school is established by student-student interactions more than adult-student interactions.
  • The kinds of problem behaviors are different in high school compared to middle and elementary school.
    • Tardy and skipping.
    • Failure to engage in work, complete work, etc.
    • Student-guided deviancy training.
    • Adult-student conflict: insubordination and disrespect.
    • Student-student aggression and harassment.
  • Problem behaviors occur at a higher rate among 9th and 10th graders than 11th and 12th.

Adults in high school make a difference through:

  • Being models
  • Defining clear expectations
  • Acknowledging appropriate behavior
  • Influencing the behavior of older students
  • Preventing problem behavior from being rewarded

 

Process for Implementing a Three-Tiered Model of Supports in High Schools

  1. Establish commitment
  2. Establish and maintain team
  3. Conduct self-assessment/audit
  4. Establish tier I (universal) supports
    1. Behavior supports
      1. Identify schoolwide behavior expectations
      2. Teach behavior expectations
      3. Monitor student behavior
      4. Acknowledge student engagement in behavior expectations
      5. Correct behavioral errors
      6. Establish classroom behavior systems
    2. Establish information systems
  5. Establish tier II (secondary) supports
    1. A team is identified to develop, implement, monitor, and evaluate tier II supports
    2. A process is developed and utilized for identifying students in need of tier II supports
  6. Establish Tier III (tertiary) Supports
    1. A team is identified to develop, implement, monitor, and evaluate tier III supports
    2. A process is developed and utilized for identifying students in need of tier III supports

Jay Engeln discusses implementing Response to Intervention (RTI) at the secondary level (from RTI Action Network)